Watching the Clock: How the TABC Regulates Hours of Operation for Off-Premises Retailers

Different types of alcoholic beverage retailers must abide by different rules when it comes to the hours during which they can sell alcohol. Last week, we looked at what Texas law has to say about when you can purchase an adult beverage at bars, restaurants, and other locations that sell alcohol for on-premises consumption. Most notably, these locations have a unique ability to stay open as late as 2 a.m. under certain circumstances.

Understanding the TABC's Authorized Hours of Operation for On-Premises Retailers

 

Ever run to your favorite liquor store only to find it closed when most businesses are open? Ever get surprised when a bar seems to close early? Ever wonder why you can’t order a cocktail on Sunday morning without food along with it?

How the TABC Regulates Promotions for On-Premises Liquor License Holders, Part 3

 By now you know the term — “On-Premises Promotions” — and that the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) has a lot to say about what works and what doesn’t.  

Today, we are wrapping up our summary of how the TABC regulates promotions carried at the locations of retailers who sell alcohol for on-premises consumption, e.g. bars and restaurants.  

How the TABC Regulates Promotions for On-Premises Liquor License Holders, Part 2

 Today we are continuing with our second installment in a blog series on how the TABC regulates “On-Premises Promotions” — a term that the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) uses to describe promotions carried at the location of a retailer who sells alcohol for consumption on its premises — predominantly bars and restaurants.  

How the TABC Regulates Promotions for On-Premises Liquor License Holders

Texas alcoholic beverage law not only regulates who can buy and sell alcohol, but also how alcoholic beverages are advertised and promoted, especially at on-premises retail locations. In fact, the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) established an entire rule entitled “On-Premises Promotions.”

What gives the TABC the authority to create that rule? What does the rule say about happy hours and drink discounts and other familiar promotions? We try to answer those questions in our three-part, blog series about on-premises promotions.

What Forms Are Needed to Report Changes to Your TABC Permit?

So, you’ve identified that you need to make a change to your business and must inform the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC). Now what?

Remember, before making any changes to the location, premises, ownership, financing, or to any information previously provided to the TABC, we strongly recommend that you carefully think through whether the change is authorized and, if it is, how and when to report the change(s) to the TABC.

How to Report Changes to the TABC for Your Texas liquor License or Permit

Congratulations! You have a Texas liquor license. You are in business and have the authority to buy and sell alcohol. The work is over right?

Unfortunately, no. As a Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) liquor license or permit holder, you have the ongoing responsibility to maintain that permit, including renewing the permit every two years and updating the TABC if any of the information you provided when you initially acquired the liquor license has changed.

What Happens to My TABC Permit Application After Submission?

As of February 2019, the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) is reporting a processing time for retailers who sell alcohol for on-premises consumption (such as restaurants and bars) of approximately 60 days. So what happens between submitting a Texas liquor license application and receiving the permit? We’ve summarized your application’s journey through the agency here.

Placing Alcohol Orders Ahead of Your TABC Permit Issuance

There are a lot of moving parts when managing a timeline for the opening of a bar or restaurant. Of course, the issuance date of your anticipated Texas liquor license or TABC permit is a major milestone. However, don’t overlook that you may have the opportunity to place orders for alcohol before that date arrives — which may help you keep your entire timeline moving forward.

What Types of TABC Permits Do Restaurants and Bars Need to Serve Alcohol?

The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) offers a couple of different options for restaurants wanting a Texas liquor license or permit. However, all options available are considered “on-premise” permits, meaning you intend to sell alcohol directly to the consumer which will be consumed on the premises.